"No one will miss me", "I’m better off dead"

after-crisis:

When I worked at a non-profit that handled suicide prevention, I had access to the donation records. Each month, a specific man donated 15$ to our organization. It was like clockwork.. same day, same man, he had been doing this for over 4 years. It always seemed odd to me but I never questioned it… until I saw a note attached one month. "For Noah- Dad"

his donation was once his child’s allowance.

I can promise you, they would miss you for the rest of their lives.

(via nauticalwhispers)

archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.
Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.
My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.
[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

Warrington, England-based architect-turned-artist David Foster uses a hammer and nails to create beautiful pointillistic works of art. His portraits are particularly impressive. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing, Foster’s pieces demonstrate the brain’s amazing ability to interpret an image made of nothing but tiny dots.

Before picking up his hammer, Foster’s process begins with a photograph and a pen:

"My work is based initially on a photograph which I painstakingly reproduce by stippling with an ink pen. The inked drawing is then enlarged to mark out where the nails go and then the nailing begins….. many thousands of nails later I have the finished piece. It is very tactile art and the viewer will find it hard not to touch the work.

My technique has evolved and developed over time, I now use tiny nails which enable the viewer to see and interpret the work more closely and in detail. I currently have over half a million nails in my studio waiting to be ‘nailed’.”

Visit David Foster’s website to check out more of his awesome nail art.

[via Design Taxi]

how many times do you think he said “nailed it” after finishing the project

(via hannielove)

Labor Day Weekend Promo

thevillagestyle:

Labor Day weekend is coming up, and you know what that means - barbecues, parties, chilling out, enjoying the last few fleeting moments of summer before school…

Whatever you’re doing, we at The Village would love to hear more about it! There are two ways you can get in touch with us: 

  1. Submit a photo here along with your favourite story from your Labor Day weekend. Remember to tag #villagesociety in the hashtag bar below!
  2. Post a photo on your Instagram and use the hashtag #villagesociety so we know to look for you! If you want, tag us @thevillagestyle as well! 

We’ll be featuring your stories all weekend long. Have fun, tell good stories, and we’ll see you on the flip side! 

i’m gonna do it.

y’all should also do it because i know that you have stories to tell.